Thirty two years old.
Liberal. Atheist. Feminist.
Portland, OR

How Honor Can Remake Society (KWAME ANTHONY APPIAH)

History has proven that the best way to end immoral practices like slavery, dueling, and foot-binding has been to appeal to one’s sense of honor.

There’s something fishy about the Starbucks logo. Aside from the obvious, I mean. I know the black and white lady inside the green circle is supposed to be a mermaid and, yes, mermaids are half-fish, half-woman, but I meant that there’s something else fishy about it. In other words, I smell a cover-up. Aside from the obvious cover-up, I mean. I know that the original logo featured the mermaid’s bared breasts and, yes, they got covered up in later redesigns of the logo. But something else is being covered up. In other other words, I smell a rat…
Interesting look into the real back-story of the Starbucks logo. Read the rest: Got Medieval: The Other Starbucks Mermaid Cover-Up
There’s something fishy about the Starbucks logo. Aside from the obvious, I mean. I know the black and white lady inside the green circle is supposed to be a mermaid and, yes, mermaids are half-fish, half-woman, but I meant that there’s something else fishy about it. In other words, I smell a cover-up. Aside from the obvious cover-up, I mean. I know that the original logo featured the mermaid’s bared breasts and, yes, they got covered up in later redesigns of the logo. But something else is being covered up. In other other words, I smell a rat…

Interesting look into the real back-story of the Starbucks logo. Read the rest: Got Medieval: The Other Starbucks Mermaid Cover-Up

Fascinating! Really smartly made introduction to the nano scale of our world.

Laurie Santos looks for the roots of human irrationality by watching the way our primate relatives make decisions. A clever series of experiments in “monkeynomics” shows that some of the silly choices we make, monkeys make too.

Totally worth your 20 minutes… fascinating!

There are people in this world who like hierarchies, they like to keep people in their place, they like law enforcement, and they probably have a lot in common, let’s say, with the chimpanzee. And then you have other people in this world who root for the underdog, they give to the poor, they feel the need to be good, and they maybe have more of this kinder bonobo side to them. Our societies are constructed around the interface between those two, so we need both actually.

RSA Animate - Crises of Capitalism (via theRSAorg)

In this RSA Animate, radical sociologist David Harvey asks if it is time to look beyond capitalism towards a new social order that would allow us to live within a system that really could be responsible, just, and humane?
The word eggcorn was coined collectively by the linguists who write at the excellent group blog Language Log. Linguists collect usage examples. Unlike language teachers or the often self-styled grammar experts who complain in the press about the decay of English, they are not picky: the actual, real-life use is what counts, and the most interesting bits — those that might reveal something about how real people apprehend their language — often stretch the received rules of correctness.

This is a fascinating collection. I know these linguists aren’t concerned with incorrect usage but I can’t help but think, “these are people that don’t read.” And that really concerns me. They hear a word or phrase spoken but have never seen it on the page so when they have to spell it, they end up with something that is less than correct. Examples include: “coal-hearted” (cold-hearted), “skimp milk” (skim milk), and “ease drop” (eavesdrop). 

Interesting stuff…

For nearly 20 years, neuroscientist Jim Fallon has studied the brains of psychopaths. After learning that his ancestry included alleged murderers, he decided to study his own brain. He was shocked at what he discovered.

Very interesting! And kind of creepy…

Different people prioritize different values over others, of course. And of course, different individuals and different cultures come to different conclusions about the right ethical choice in any particular situation: based on our cultural biases, as well as on our own personal observations and experiences. But according to this research, these basic values — fairness, harm, loyalty, authority and purity — exist in all of us, at least to some degree, in every non-sociopathic human being.
"Fascinating," I hear you cry. "But what does that have to do with politics?" Well, what researchers are finding is that liberals prioritize very different values from conservatives.

I had heard about this research before— this is an interesting analysis.

abbyjean:

The  Evolution of the World Cup Ball - NYTimes

1970 seems to have been a pivotal year!

abbyjean:

The Evolution of the World Cup Ball - NYTimes

1970 seems to have been a pivotal year!

When people ask me ‘did Mark Twain really mean it to take 100 years for this to come out’, I say ‘he was certainly a man who knew how to make people want to buy a book.’

This guy, on Mark Twain’s forthcoming autobiography, which is being published a century after his death, per his wishes. (via) (via spiegelman) (via ericmortensen) (via soupsoup)

Fascinating!

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have found that of all the greenhouse gases generated by the average U.S. household when it consumes food, the transport of the food accounts for just 11 percent. The best way to reduce the carbon footprint of our diet is not to eat locally but simply to eat less, especially less meat. Eating one less serving of red meat a week achieves the same reduction in emissions as switching to a 100 percent local diet.

—Robert Paarlberg, Food Politics: What Everyone Needs to Know